COUNTER UAS (CUAS)

COUNTER UAS DEFENSE SYSTEM

• TRL-9 Rated
• Deployed with US Forces

 

 

A400 SERIES AIR SECURITY RADAR

• Detect Small UAS & Track
• High-Sensitivity Thermal Imager & State-of-the-Art Video Tracking
• Smart RF Inhibitor Uses Directional Antennas for Maximum Range with Minimum Collateral impact

ADIS (COUNTER-UAS DETECTION & IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM)

• Exclusively Built for Industrial & Commercial Applications
• Full Disruption Capabilities may be added in the future if approved

HIGH-RELIABILITY ELECTRONIC BEAM SCANNING (E-SCAN) TECHNOLOGY

• Exceptional Slow Movement Detection with Fast Scan Rates
• Doppler Signal Processing Technology
• Three Degrees of Target Discrimination
• Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) Technology

Liteye's Counter-UAS Defense System (CUAS) combines electronic-scanning radar target detection, electro-optical (EO) tracking/classification and directional RF inhibition capability.

CUAS is a smart-sensor and effector package capable of remotely detecting small UAS and then tracking and classifying them before providing the option to disrupt their activity. The system may be used in remote or urban areas to prevent UASs being used for terrorist attacks, espionage or other malicious activities against sites with critical infrastructure. CUAS not only works to cover your airspace, but also as a ground surveillance system as well.

All brought together in USA by Liteye Systems, who integrates, installs, and trains operators out of their Colorado facility.

M-AUDS VEHICLE PROGRAM

Bradley Fighting Vehicle

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ADIS

Counter-uas detection & identification system commercially available

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Mexican Cartel Crashes Drone IED into Home of Border State Security Chief

Cartel gunmen are suspected of crashing a drone outfitted with grenades into the home of the Secretary of Public Safety of Baja California. The official was on his way to meet with U.S. consular authorities at the time of the attack. 

The attack took place in Tecate, Baja California, when the Secretary of Public Security Gerardo Manuel Sosa Olachea was on his way to meet with Sue Saarniola, the U.S. Consul General in Tijuana. En route to the meeting, Sosa’s security personnel was alerted about a drone flying over his home, El Semanario Zeta reported. State agents and military personnel collected the drone, which had a video system and two fragmentation grenades taped to it. 

In a statement, the state government revealed Sosa does not live in the house he has in Tecate; since he took office, he changed his job to the city of Mexicali. In the statement, the state claimed it would redouble efforts in fighting organized crime. In an interview with local media, Sosa ruled out any direct personal threats since he was appointed last October, although he suspects the attack is tied to drug cartels lashing out following various seizures and raids on narco-laboratories in the region. Authorities did not reveal arrests for the drone.

Read Full Article

The U.S. isn’t prepared for the growing threat of drones

Drone technology offers the potential to change our world — from enabling historic transformations in e-commerce to faster emergency response. But the technology also has a dark side. It can be used to spy on us, to threaten our critical infrastructure, or to attack crowds and public places.

For years, the Department of Homeland Security has worried about the dangers of unmanned aerial systems, and we have sought the legal authority to protect Americans against corrupted aerial devices. Today I have a pressing message for Congress: Time is running out.

As secretary of homeland security, I can tell you that threat is outpacing our ability to respond. Without congressional action, the U.S. government will remain unable to identify, track and mitigate weaponized or dangerous drones in our skies.

Just last month, officials at U.S. Customs and Border Protection reported a spike in the use of drones at our borders. Transnational criminals are undoubtedly exploiting these systems to search for security gaps so they can avoid our officers and sneak into the country undetected.

Criminals are also using them to smuggle drugs. Last year, Border Patrol agents arrested a 25-year-old man for using a drone to ferry tens of thousands of dollars’ worth of methamphetamine across the southwest border, raising the specter that other dangerous goods could be transported the same way.

Worse still, terrorist groups such as the Islamic State aspire to use armed drones against our homeland and U.S. interests overseas. They have deployed bomb-laden aerial devices on the battlefield to surveil, disrupt and kill opposing forces, and they are sharing that expertise with others.

Read the Full Article at the Washington Post

SEE Liteye’s Anti Drone technology, AUDS, is a smart-sensor and effector package capable of remotely detecting small UAS and then tracking and classifying them before providing the option to disrupt their activity. The system may be used in remote or urban areas to prevent UAS being used for terrorist attacks, espionage or other malicious activities against sites with critical infrastructure.

Did a drone help this notorious French gangster escape from prison?

It was a prison escape that wouldn’t have looked out of place in a Hollywood action movie.

Last Sunday, at least three armed associates of notorious French gangster Rdoine Fad flew a hijacked helicopter into the grounds of Rau prison, south of Paris.

Witnesses watched in shock as the helicopter flew in and the operation to help 46-year-old Fad escape got underway. Three men leaped from the helicopter before letting off gas canisters to disorientate those nearby. They then used a grinding machine to destroy a door that led to the visitor room where Fad was located.

According to France’s justice ministry, the drama was over in just “a few minutes.”

The helicopter was flown to a spot 37 miles away, where a car was waiting for them. The pilot was unharmed.

It later emerged that the helicopter had landed in a part of the prison that did not have anti-flight netting over it as it was ordinarily used by visitors only.

Hobby drone assistance?

Nicole Belloubet, France’s justice minister, revealed on Monday that investigators suspect camera-equipped hobby drones may have been used by Fad’s gang for reconnaissance missions in the lead up to the audacious jailbreak.

Drones have been spotted flying over the prison multiple times in recent months, leading the authorities to suggest a possible link to the jailbreak.

“Someone spotted this possible way out, and it could have been done usingdrones,” Belloubet said.

Fad was serving 25 years for the murder of a cop during a robbery in 2010. Before that, he’d served jail time for armed robberies of banks and vans transporting cash. And it’s not the first time he’s launched a spectacular breakout. In 2013, he escaped from a different prison by using explosives to blast his way out. He was caught six weeks later.

A nationwide hunt for Fad and his gang is now underway.

Drones and prisons

While we’ve heard plenty of stories about hobby drones being used to fly contraband into prisons, it’s the first time we’ve happened upon a case where they may have been used to survey a jail ahead of act like this.

Quadcopters and the like are a growing problem for prisons, with the small machines able to fly right into the grounds with little difficulty.In 2017, a drone gang was jailed in the U.K. for flying contraband including drugs, weapons, and phones worth a total of $1.3 million into five different prisons on nearly 50 occasions over two years.A number of high-tech solutions have been tested, but the wide-scale rollout of a particular system is yet to take place.

Read more: http://www.cbs46.com/story/38562179/did-a-drone-help-a-notorious-french-gangster-escape-from-prison#ixzz5KJCqnshq

Learn More about Liteye’s ADIS Counter Drone program designed to DETECT, TRACK, AND IDENTIFY malicious UAS / Drone operators.

Because ADIS is a ground surveillance system as well as UAS detection, you have a powerful tool that is capable of capturing UAS pilots, both on radar & video, many times before they even launch.

The system may be used in remote or urban areas to detect UAS being used for terrorist attacks, espionage, or other malicious activities against sites with critical infrastructure.

Greenpeace activists ‘crash’ drone into French nuclear plant

Lyon (AFP) – Greenpeace activists said Tuesday they had flown a drone fitted out as a flying Superman into a nuclear energy plant in southeast France, aiming to show how the country’s reactors are vulnerable to terror attacks.

A video released by the environmental group shows the drone zipping through restricted airspace above the Bugey plant about 25 kilometres (16 miles) outside Lyon before crashing into a building on site.

It said the drone struck a storage pool for spent nuclear fuel next to a reactor, one of the most radioactive areas at the site.

“This is a highly symbolic action: it shows that spent fuel pools are very accessible, this time from the air, and therefore extremely vulnerable to attack,” Yannick Rousselet, head of Greenpeace France’s anti-nuclear campaign, in a statement.

French electricity group EDF played down any security risk, saying police forces had intercepted one of two drones launched by Greenpeace at dawn on Tuesday.

“The fuel building is key for security, designed in particular to withstand natural or accidental damage, which ensures its high degree of robustness,” the company said, adding that it would lodge a complaint with police.

Greenpeace has carried out several actions aimed at highlighting the danger posed by French nuclear plants, which generate the bulk of the country’s electricity needs.

In February, eight activists were sentenced to jail terms or fines after breaking into a plant and setting off fireworks last year.

After Greenpeace activists broke into another nuclear plant last November, the French government opened a parliamentary inquiry into nuclear safety and security.

The findings of the report, which include an analysis of potential risks of drones equipped with explosives, are expected to be released soon.

In 2014 and 2015, drone flights were reported over several French nuclear plants, including Bugey, though Greenpeace denied any involvement.

Article appeared in Yahoo.com

State-of-the-Art Helmet Mounted Displays, Thermal Imaging, Radar Surveillance Equipment and Counter-Drone Solutions