The Iran-backed rebels’ new capabilities in UAV technology pose an increased threat to the region, intelligence sources and defence experts say

Saudi-led coalition spokesman, Colonel Turki Al Maliki, displays the debris of a ballistic missile which he says was launched by Yemen’s Houthi group towards the capital Riyadh, during a news conference in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia March 29, 2020. Reuters

Iranian proxy forces have created their own drone manufacturing industry, increasing threats to the region, defence experts and intelligence sources have warned.

There are increased security concerns that Houthi rebels in Yemen are becoming increasingly capable in making unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) that can carry explosives long distances.

Their new skills are part of Iran’s strategy to use drones and UAV technology to project its power across the region with the ability to use ‘plausible deniability’ as an excuse for attacks.

It is now using the technology, aligned with its development of highly accurate ballistic missiles, to demonstrate to Gulf States, the US and others that a military attack on Iran would come with significant consequences.

“When you look at what Iran has been doing, it is all very consistent with its reliance on non-conventional tools that allow it to project power with plausible deniability that does not lead to the threat of direct confrontation,” said Dr Aniseh Bassiri Tabrizi, of the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI).

The Middle East specialist warned that Iran’s brinksmanship could result in a “confrontation without that being the intention”.

She added: “Iraq is the closest case we have seen where this type of strategy is translating into warfare between the two sides.”

Iranian proxy forces have created their own drone manufacturing industry, increasing threats to the region, defence experts and intelligence sources have warned.

There are increased security concerns that Houthi rebels in Yemen are becoming increasingly capable in making unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) that can carry explosives long distances.

Their new skills are part of Iran’s strategy to use drones and UAV technology to project its power across the region with the ability to use ‘plausible deniability’ as an excuse for attacks.

It is now using the technology, aligned with its development of highly accurate ballistic missiles, to demonstrate to Gulf States, the US and others that a military attack on Iran would come with significant consequences.

“When you look at what Iran has been doing, it is all very consistent with its reliance on non-conventional tools that allow it to project power with plausible deniability that does not lead to the threat of direct confrontation,” said Dr Aniseh Bassiri Tabrizi, of the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI).

The Middle East specialist warned that Iran’s brinksmanship could result in a “confrontation without that being the intention”.

She added: “Iraq is the closest case we have seen where this type of strategy is translating into warfare between the two sides.”

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Article Courtesy of THE NATIONAL

 

 

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